grok

Accents, English, Arrogance, Success

[edit: thanks to Thomas B. for correcting a few mistakes I did below. You rock!] The recent discussion around “Accents” is very dear to me. Let me tell you something. Read on. 1) Accents Paul Graham recently wrote about accents. Simply put: if you have a strong accent (e.g. your English is not that great), you are more likely perform poorly as the CEO of a startup. It is rather obvious, but important to know. One more point that Paul raises is that when communication is important (when you are the CEO of a Startup, and not just any employee),…

How to improve Hacker News

Take a look at this thread: The user “tokenadult” is a great commenter. I have no way to see his Karma from here. My proposal is very simple. Today, this is what I see when someone comments: Tomorrow, it should be like this: Thoughts? Discuss on Hacker News.

On money

Seth Godin has a great post on money. Just go there and read it. He also mentions the need to learn a few concepts, and here’s the short, simple explanation for them: Opportunity cost: the value of the best alternative forgone, in a situation in which a choice needs to be made between several mutually exclusive alternatives given limited resources. Assuming the best choice is made, it is the “cost” incurred by not enjoying the benefit that would be had by taking the second best choice available. Opportunity cost is what you must forgo in order to get something. Investment: putting…

Hackers everywhere

Most people don’t know what an hacker is. It’s not easy for me to come up with a definition with which most people would agree… But here it comes: Hackers thrive on sharing, collaborating, and improving their field. (inspired by this). I work in the field of technology (software, systems, Cloud Computing, etc.), and of course I’m very familiar with the “hacker” approach in these fields. I don’t think that hackers should necessary be “against” a particular form of protection, law, or approach to technology: I simply think that being a hacker means that you want to make the world…

Don’t build a fast company, build a slow one

It’s Friday, there’s still a lot to do, but I need a quick break, and I decided to read some of my feeds and take a casual look at my twitter stream. This is how I found this interview with Jason Fried, CEO of 37signals. There are many interesting points in the interview, but in short they can be summarized as: 1) love your company and your employees 2) do what’s best for them 3) don’t overburn; plan for the long term This is one of the parts that I loved the most: I’m a fan of growing slowly, carefully,…

14 “STIC” bloggers worth following

Fred Wilson works at Union Square Ventures. A few days ago he wrote a blog post titled “blogs we read“. Quoting from him (bold is mine): “Blog discovery is still too hard. There are so many great blogs out there and it is still too hard to find them.” I agree! Therefore, I decided to write my own list of blogs to follow. But first… Why these blogs should be important to you? Well, this time I want to list blogs that are important mostly from a work perspective. If you are into Startups, Technology, Innovation, Cloud (STIC) then these…

Ryan Carson

I’ve met Ryan Carson in April 2009, in Dubai. Unfortunately for me, it was the only physical encounter with him, and I say “unfortunately” because I think that it’s nice when Ryan is around. Ryan now runs Treehouse, a startup that wants to teach you how to design software. I won’t go into details of what we discussed in Dubai (also because I don’t remember ALL the details), but suffice to say that in just a few days, my opinion of Ryan,both as a person and as an entrepreneur, was very high. I just saw a video of Ryan, at…

Bryan Stevenson at TED

I just watched this one over lunch (yes, if there are only 24 hours in a day and you can’t change that, you can make a better use of your time): it’s a TED talk by Bryan Stevenson. It quickly became one of my all-time favorites. I don’t want to tell you anything about it. Watch it. Simple as that. Ah, by the way: it seems that TEDsters liked it as well. In fact, this talk received the strongest standing ovation ever seen at TED (according to Wikipedia).

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